Month: February 2018

Stop blaming video games for mass shootings

Posted on February 28, 2018  in Video Games

Illustration by Rick Nease (Detroit Free Press 2003)

In wake of the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting, President Trump said he believes video games are having a negative effect on the nation’s youth.

“We have to do something about maybe what they’re seeing and how they’re seeing it, and also, video games,” President Trump told Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi during a discussion on school safety at the White House last week. “I’m hearing more and more people say the level of violence in video games is really shaping young peoples’ thoughts.”

There is a self-regulatory rating system already in place for video games. The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) was established in 1994 in response to criticism of controversial video games featuring excessive violent or sexual content.

The debate on the effects of video game violence goes back to the early days of the medium. The increases in graphics and sound capabilities in the 90s and the ability to use full-motion video prompted the government to pressure video game developers and publishers to come out with their own rating system to avoid federal regulations.

Once again, video games are being scapegoated and used to distract people from the issue of mass shootings.

No evidence suggests video games directly cause violence. On the contrary, dozens of studies published found games had no impact on aggressive behavior or cause players to kill people in real life, including a 2013 New York Times article that concluded more recent science does not contradict these findings.

One thing that isn’t often brought up, however, is the fact every form of crime has fallen in correlation to the rise of video games. According to the Pew Research Center, the violent crime rate in the US fell 48 percent between 1993 and 2016.

The United States isn’t the only country in which people play violent video games. No other developed nations in the world experience the kind of mass shootings we have in the US. For instance, in Japan, 60 percent of the population plays video games and yet gun violence is almost nonexistent.

Perhaps more relevant, in 2011 the Supreme Court granted video games the same free speech protections that other artistic mediums enjoy. To insinuate video game developers shouldn’t create the games they want to make because someone else might feel uncomfortable goes against the principles of artistic expression and free speech.

I have been playing video games since I was six years old, and I’ve been a hardcore gamer since high school. Some of my favorite games of all time include M-rated (Mature [17+]) games such as “Doom”, “Mortal Kombat”, “Grand Theft Auto” and “Metal Gear”. To associate mass shootings with the medium is not only inaccurate but also insulting to the millions of people who enjoy the hobby.

More than anything, video games, like any other art form, should be able to explore mature themes and tell stories that challenge their audience without being attacked or stigmatized by people to have no experience with the medium.

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Month: February 2018

FLIR Named Official Video Security Provider of Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games

Posted on February 28, 2018  in Video Games

FLIR Named Official Video Security Provider of Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games

FLIR Provides Over 300 Cameras and Video Management Software to Increase Security Surveillance at Athlete Village and City Perimeter Protection

FLIR Systems, Inc. has announced it has been selected as the official Video Security Provider of the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games (GC2018) in Australia. FLIR will provide surveillance equipment, including security cameras and video management software (VMS), to help national and local law enforcement provide safety and security at the Games from April 4 – 15, 2018.    

In preparation for GC2018, FLIR has delivered a suite of visible and thermal security cameras, including fixed and pan-tilt-zoom cameras. In many cases the cameras will be equipped with embedded video analytics, the cameras will detect threats and stream live information to allow rapid response to security events at the Commonwealth Games’ venues. To protect this high-profile international event, FLIR will also provide a mix of thermal imaging cameras that operate day and night, through light fog or smoke, ensuring continual observation and accurate detection capabilities.

 “Public safety is our number one priority and we are determined to make sure all athletes and spectators are able to enjoy GC2018,” said GOLDOC Chairman, Peter Beattie AC. “The Games are a major sporting event – not a security event – and importantly for fans, we are using a number of products, like those being delivered by FLIR, to provide a safe and secure environment while still allowing for efficient access to venues for patrons, athletes and officials in an unobtrusive manner. We have acquired the largest number of sponsors for any Commonwealth Games and I’m pleased to welcome FLIR to the GC2018 Sponsor Family.”

“FLIR is honored to be selected as the official supplier of video security for Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games,” said Travis Merrill, President of FLIR Commercial Business Unit. “FLIR products will provide wide area, 24/7 surveillance to ensure the protection of the Gold Coast community, guests, and athletes. Our end-to-end suite of security solutions supports the comprehensive plan for a safe and successful Commonwealth Games, and we look forward to playing a role in this celebration of ‘Humanity, Equality, and Destiny’.”

To learn more about FLIR security products and solutions, visit www.flir.com/security.


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Month: February 2018

March is stacked with new video games — here are the 10 biggest releases coming next month

Posted on February 28, 2018  in Video Games

Can you feel it? The wave is coming.

With March, the first huge wave of game releases is about to crash. Prepare yourself!


Rare/Microsoft Studios

Between a major new entry in the blockbuster “Far Cry” series — set in the United States for the first-time ever, no less — and a huge new entry in the Nintendo’s beloved “Kirby” franchise, March is stacked with video game releases.

And that’s before we start talking about the hotly-anticipated “Sea of Thieves,” a rare Xbox One and PC exclusive game, or the PlayStation 4 exclusive “MLB The Show 18.”

Here are all the biggest video games coming in March 2018:

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Month: February 2018

The video game ratings board is cracking down on microtransactions — and it could have major repercussions for the future of video games

Posted on February 28, 2018  in Video Games

The latest major “Star Wars” game, above, was embroiled in controversy over in-game microtransactions.

EA DICE

  • The Entertainment Software Ratings Board (ESRB) oversees video game ratings in North America.
  • On Tuesday, the ESRB announced that a new label will be applied to games “with in-game offers to purchase digital goods or premiums with real world currency.”
  • The label will show up on retail boxes in stores, as well as on digital storefronts like the PlayStation Store and Xbox Games Store.
  • The move comes after lawmakers in several states have proposed steps to regulate in-game purchases.

The group that oversees video-game ratings in North America just announced a huge change that impacts all games, and the future of the industry as a whole.

Going forward, any video game “with in-game offers to purchase digital goods or premiums with real world currency” must be labeled with a new sticker that says “In-Game Purchases.”

More directly: Any game with in-game purchases must now be labeled as such.

The move is a warning to consumers about potentially expensive components of a game they’re about to buy. The group that oversees game ratings in North America, the Entertainment Software Ratings Board (ESRB), is framing the move around parents being informed.

So-called “loot boxes” are a common concept in modern games.

Blizzard Entertainment

“With the new In-Game Purchases interactive element coming to physical games, parents will know when a game contains offers for players to purchase additional content,” ESRB president Patricia Vance said in the press release that announced the new labels.

Beyond informing parents, the move is in response to the controversy surrounding several notable video games released in 2017. The biggest most recent example is “Star Wars Battlefront 2,” which infuriated players with its choice to lock major characters behind a paywall (the move was quickly retracted).

Players were mad enough, and vocal enough, that legislators got involved at one point.

Then, in February, Senator Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire got in touch with the ESRB directly.

“I respectfully urge the ESRB to review the completeness of the board’s ratings process and policies as they relate to loot boxes, and to take into account the potential harm these types of micro-transactions may have on children,” Hassan wrote in the letter.

An example of the new label is seen above on the right side.

ESRB

Without saying as much directly, the ESRB is adding the label in an attempt to assuage the concerns of legislators. It’s a small move, but it’s one that impacts all video games published on game consoles in North America. Whether or not consumers will notice the label, or care, is another question altogether.

Beyond the new label, the ESRB has also launched a website dedicated to educating parents on various aspects of gaming — from parental control instructions for each console, to information about how various online services work, and all sorts of other stuff.

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Month: February 2018

Tech: The video game ratings board is cracking down on microtransactions — and it could have major repercussions for the future of video games

Posted on February 28, 2018  in Video Games

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  • The Entertainment Software Ratings Board (ESRB) oversees video game ratings in North America.
  • On Tuesday, the ESRB announced that a new label will be applied to games “with in-game offers to purchase digital goods or premiums with real world currency.”
  • The label will show up on retail boxes in stores, as well as on digital storefronts like the PlayStation Store and Xbox Games Store.
  • The move comes after lawmakers in several states have proposed steps to regulate in-game purchases.

The group that oversees video-game ratings in North America just announced a huge change that impacts all games, and the future of the industry as a whole.

Going forward, any video game “with in-game offers to purchase digital goods or premiums with real world currency” must be labeled with a new sticker that says “In-Game Purchases.”

More directly: Any game with in-game purchases must now be labeled as such.

The move is a warning to consumers about potentially expensive components of a game they’re about to buy. The group that oversees game ratings in North America, the Entertainment Software Ratings Board (ESRB), is framing the move around parents being informed.


So-called play

So-called “loot boxes” are a common concept in modern games.

(Blizzard Entertainment)

“With the new In-Game Purchases interactive element coming to physical games, parents will know when a game contains offers for players to purchase additional content,” ESRB president Patricia Vance said in the press release that announced the new labels.

Beyond informing parents, the move is in response to the controversy surrounding several notable video games released in 2017. The biggest most recent example is “Star Wars Battlefront 2,” which infuriated players with its choice to lock major characters behind a paywall (the move was quickly retracted).

Players were mad enough, and vocal enough, that legislators got involved at one point.

Then, in February, Senator Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire got in touch with the ESRB directly.

“I respectfully urge the ESRB to review the completeness of the board’s ratings process and policies as they relate to loot boxes, and to take into account the potential harm these types of micro-transactions may have on children,” Hassan wrote in the letter.


An example of the new label is seen above on the right side.play

An example of the new label is seen above on the right side.

(ESRB)

Without saying as much directly, the ESRB is adding the label in an attempt to assuage the concerns of legislators. It’s a small move, but it’s one that impacts all video games published on game consoles in North America. Whether or not consumers will notice the label, or care, is another question altogether.

Beyond the new label, the ESRB has also launched a website dedicated to educating parents on various aspects of gaming — from parental control instructions for each console, to information about how various online services work, and all sorts of other stuff.

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Month: February 2018

‘Black Panther’ Proves That Marvel Should Be Making Superhero Video Games

Posted on February 28, 2018  in Video Games


Credit: Marvel

Black Panther should be a video game at this point, and so should many other superheroes.

Every year we get two or three new Marvel Cinematic Universe movies. Last year saw the release of Spider-Man: Homecoming, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2 and Thor: Ragnarok.

All three of these films were pretty great. They weren’t the best MCU movies ever made, but they were all incredibly fun. I love Tom Holland’s new Spider-Man. Thor: Ragnarok was far and away the best of the three Thor films. And while the second Guardians wasn’t as good as the first, it did have that scene where Yondu says “I’m Mary Poppins, y’all.” So that was neat.

In 2018, we’ve already seen the release of one of the biggest superhero movies of all time. Black Panther is a beast at the box office. It’s smashing records left and right because it’s a really, really good movie with one of the best villains in any superhero movie ever. Period.

In a couple months, we’ll see the release of Avengers: Infinity War, which is bound to set its own box office records and make Disney and Marvel great big buckets of cash.

The only thing missing from this incredibly profitable scenario is any sort of video game tie-in. In fact, outside of a handful of mobile titles and LEGO games, there are pretty much no MCU video games to speak of. No Thor, no Hulk, no Avengers. There’s an unrelated PS4 exclusive Spider-Man game releasing later this year, but that’s the full extent of AAA Marvel titles on the horizon. As a fan of the MCU and an avid video game player, this isn’t just depressing, it feels like a huge missed opportunity for Disney and Marvel.

Paul Tassi and I talk about this strange dearth of superhero video games in our latest Overworld podcast. You can listen to our segment below. It begins at the 40:09 mark:

It’s strange that the extent of console superhero titles are basically fighting games like Marvel vs Capcom or the admittedly excellent Injustice 2. Disney/Marvel should license major publishers, or even indie studios, to come out with cool action games that don’t necessarily even need to be direct tie-ins to the MCU films, though a big open-world Avengers game makes a ton of sense.

Meanwhile, on the DC side it’s a shame that Warner Bros. seems content to only make Batman titles. Batman and Spider-Man are essentially the only video game superheroes these days, and as much as I love both characters, it’s still a shame.

It’s true that many licensed games suffer from lackluster design and, like movies inspired by video games, aren’t always the best. But I look back at the old Lord of the Rings action games and, as linear and basic as they were, they were also a ton of fun. A co-op action brawler like that, but with DC or Marvel characters, just makes a ton of sense to me.

Listen to last week’s podcast, in which we discuss the weird problem with video game movies, here.

What do you think? Let me know on Twitter or Facebook, and thanks for reading and listening to our podcast. You can subscribe to the Overworld podcast on iTunes.

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Month: February 2018

GodMode promises to make you better at video games

Posted on February 28, 2018  in Video Games

Boss Level Labs this past October launched a dietary supplement called GodMode. Aimed specifically at gamers, the pills are packed with 14 brain-boosting nootropics – ingredients designed to improve cognitive functions in healthy adults.

Folks were naturally skeptical at the time, and rightfully so. Could a pill really help you be better at video games? Roughly five months later, we’ve got some feedback to go by.

Brett Makedonski with Destructoid took the supplement for a solid month and notes that while “the pills probably work,” he felt no uptick in how he played games. Regardless of when he took the pills (before hopping into competitive games like PUBG or Rocket League or even before starting his work day), Makedonski felt the exact same as he did without the pills and / or just under the influence of caffeine.

CNET’s Abrar Al-Heeti reached out to more than a dozen scientists, health experts and universities regarding GodMode. “No one in the department wants to talk about it because it is all hype and there is no scientific evidence” to support the supplement’s claims, a Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine representative said. Others said the product was bogus or didn’t want to talk about it at all.

For those curious, GodMode’s list of ingredients is as follows:

  • Yamabushitake powder (200mg)
  • Theobromine (200mg)
  • Artichoke 4:1 extract (200mg)
  • Bacosides A & B (100mg)
  • Acetyl-L carnitine (100mg)
  • L-Theanine (100mg)
  • Beet powder (100mg)
  • Citicoline (100mg)
  • Caffeine (75mg)
  • Pterostilbene 12:1 extract (40mg)
  • Coleus forskohili extract (20mg)
  • Bioperine black pepper extract (5mg)
  • Lithium (500mg)
  • Huperzine A (40mg)

Details on each ingredient can be found on Boss Level Labs’ website.

Eurogamer’s Chris Bratt reached out to Dr. Kimberly Urban, a neuroscientist based in Philadelphia, for an opinion on the supplement.

“Well what jumped out at me,” said Dr. Urban, “was the fact that it contains caffeine, it also contains theobromine which is another stimulant. It is going to provide a sensation of enhanced alertness and focus, but that’s just from the caffeine. You’d get the same thing from drinking a couple of cups of coffee.”

Al-Heeti was put in touch with multiple people that vouched for GodMode including Ronnie Castro, a 35-year-old network engineer from Los Angeles, and Dennis Delgado, a computer programmer in San Leandro, California.

“Everything is improved as far as focus and drive,” Castro said. “When I’m on it, then I feel I don’t have to warm up to do things.” Delgado, meanwhile, said, “I was using it for gaming-related things, but then I started seeing benefits overlapping to concentration for programming.” Again, these endorsements were supplied by Boss Level Labs.

Eurogamer also found a list of “Pro Users” on Boss Level Labs’ website. Here’s what they had to say about it:

Fortunately Boss Level Labs advertises a list of what it calls its ‘Pro Users’, including Grandmaster Judit Polgár, but also a gameplay designer who’d worked on Gears of War, the co-founder of Remedy Entertainment, the co-founder of Ready at Dawn and a long list of other industry names from the gaming, fitness and literary worlds.

Starting with Ms Polgár, I began contacting each of the Pro Users, requesting an interview about their experience with the supplement. She declined the interview, as did one other person on the list. There were a handful of users I just couldn’t get in touch with, but others stopped replying once GodMode had been mentioned. Two of the Pro Users told me they hadn’t taken the supplement at all, with one of those users going on to request he be removed from the site. Another explained that although he was passionate about the project because he’d known Boss Level Labs CEO, Scott Miller for years, he wasn’t sure he’d noticed any effect from taking GodMode for three months.

As for Bratt’s personal experience with the supplement, he said he certainly felt something. “There was an effect. I felt more alert, less groggy and occasionally a little lightheaded for half an hour or so. Which, as Dr. Urban had predicted, felt quite similar to drinking a couple of cups of strong coffee in quick succession. It didn’t feel especially obvious to me that anything more complex than that was happening.”

Over on Amazon, GodMode currently has three user reviews – a five-star review, a three-star review and a one-star review. One user spoke highly of the yamabushitake powder, another warned of potential crashes and the third experienced zero effect.

As with any supplement, it may not be a bad idea to consult with your doctor before taking.

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Month: February 2018

The best video games of 2018 (so far)

Posted on February 28, 2018  in Video Games

Even before most of us  have had time to sample 2017’s bumper crop of gaming gems, including some of the finest ever made, the new year has started with some stunning video games of its own. From thrilling hunts of giant beasts to a touching tale of young love, 2018 has already opened an impressive and eclectic gaming library.

Long may it continue. But to get you started, here are our favourite video games of 2018 so far. With many more to come.

Iconoclasts

PlatformsPS4, PC, Vita Developer Konjak

What is it? Retro-themed 2D puzzle-platformer that has you travelling a religiously-ruled technological dystopia as young mechanic Robin.

Why we love it Pretty as its Mega Drive styling is, Iconoclasts proves itself as more than simply another cartoonish retro retread with its smart balance between twitch shooting and cerebral puzzling. While the teasers scattered throughout are smart enough in their own right, the battles against screen-filling robotic menaces have their own quirks as you locate, and exploit, each enemy’s weakness.

Subnautica

Platform PC Developer Unknown Worlds Entertainment

What is it? Tense and challenging survival game that has you staving off hunger, thirst and man-eating aquatic beasts on a mysterious ocean planet.

Why we love itSubnautica takes many of the Minecraft-inspired survival traits and makes it its own. Its ocean planet is a gorgeous, terrifying environment to explore; the twisted, creature-infested caves tempting you with fresh resources to take back to base. It is underwater adventuring done right, asking you to balance your safety and oxygen level with your own curiosity. And if that kind of thing sounds a bit stressful, Subnautica also provides more relaxed creative modes to allow you to splash around at your own pace.

 

Monster Hunter World 

PlatformsPS4, Xbox One Developer Capcom

What is it? The spectacular return of Capcom’s giant beast slaying RPG.

Why we love it Much has been made of Monster Hunter World’s play for the mainstream; with its thrilling action and giant weaponry opened up beyond its sizable cult following. But while this is a notably more accessible expedition for new hunters, you will still find a complex, wonderfully eccentric and endlessly entertaining adventure. Finally downing a towering beast after an epic battle across World’s gorgeous environments is one of gaming’s most satisfying feats.

Full review

Shadow of the Colossus

PlatformPS4 Developer Sony/Bluepoint Games

What is it? Beautiful remaster of Team Ico’s seminal 2005 adventure that has you roaming a forbidden land in order to slay 13 enormous colossi.

Why we love it Shadow of the Colossus remains one of the finest games ever made; the haunting melancholy that tinges the thrilling battles against impossibly huge creatures remaining as potent as it did more than a decade ago. It’s a fabulous game with a fierce challenge, but asks crushing questions about love, motivation, sacrifice and cruelty. And the PS4 upgrade is simply stunning, with improved camera, controls and technical oomph bringing the game’s artistic vision to life.

Full review

Celeste

PlatformPS4, Xbox One, Switch, PC Developer Matt Makes Games

What is it? Terrifically tough twitch platformer from the creator of Towerfall that has you guiding young Madeline up a hostile mountain and through her own inner turmoil.

Why we love it Its pixel-perfect platforming is deeply satisfying and fiercely challenging, scratching a similar itch to Super Meat Boy and their ilk. And the collectible strawberries scattered throughout will become your new obsession. Celeste also ties this to an effective and compelling tale of Madeline’s struggle as she faces depression and panic attacks during her ascent.

 

Dragon Ball FighterZ

PlatformsPS4, Xbox One Developer Arc System Works

What is it? Classic one on one fighting action based on the long-running and hugely popular manga series.

Why we love it While the core of Dragon Ball FighterZ will be familiar, it layers on its own quirks and personality to keep fighting fresh. The dedication to Dragon Ball lore throws up some fascinating, match-swinging mechanics and a supremely varied roster. Its terrific stuff and more accessible than many fighting games, keeping its inputs and special moves easy to learn. Gorgeous too.

Descenders

PlatformPC Developer RageSquid

What is it? Blistering downhill mountain-biking that takes its cues from games like Skate and SSX.

Why we love it Its breakneck biking, flips and chicanery might recall something like Trials, but Descenders earns its stripes with its gorgeous procedurally generated courses. Each descent is different, throwing up ramps and turns that rely on twitch reaction and mastery of mechanics rather than learning each level. It does mean it can be punishing and frustrating, too, but that challenge can add to the satisfaction of nailing a run.

Bayonetta 1 and 2

Platform Switch Developer Platinum Games

What is it? Switch upgrade to two of the most brilliant, and bonkers, action games ever made.

Why we love it Following the announcement of Bayonetta 3, it is the perfect time to reacquaint ourselves with the salacious Umbra Witch. Bayonetta is the hero who summons screen-filling demons with her hair (which is also her clothes) so she can punch Gods into the sun. Both games are a constant cacophony of colourful chaos, but the peerless combat mechanics allow you to slip into a zen-like ballet; flipping and weaving between attacks while the flurry of weaponry on both hands and feet turn angels into kibble. If that doesn’t appeal, well, I don’t know what else to tell you.

Florence

PlatformiOS, Android Developer Mountains

What is it? Wonderful interactive comic book about modern love from the creator of Monument Valley.

Why we love it This sweet and fleeting tale of millenial life brilliantly tells of the thrill, exploration and sacrifice of a burgeoning relationship. While your interaction is relatively limited as its wordless yarn unfolds, your gentle swipes abstractly capture thoughts and feeling. It’s beautifully presented, smart and wonderfully uplifting without being saccharine.

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Month: February 2018

Are video games immune to cryptocurrency failure?

Posted on February 28, 2018  in Video Games

A new study has shown ventures funded by Initial Coin Offerings are struggling, but research by GamesIndustry.biz suggests video games ICOs are not among them.

ICOs have risen in popularity over the last year as cryptocurrency has been embraced by a wider audience. The process is much the same as an IPO but instead of shares in the company, investors buy tokens that can later be spent on the finished product or service.

Cryptocurrency news site Bitcoin.com reports that 46 per cent of token sales from 2017 have already failed. Using ICO tracker Tokendata.io, the site asserts that out of the 902 sales last year a total of 418 never launched their final product.

142 of these were unable to raise the necessary funding via the ICO itself, while 276 have since disappeared – “either due to taking the money and running, or slowly fading into obscurity,” according to Bitcoin.com.

The failure rate increases to 59 per cent when taking into account the 113 ICOs where the company has stopped communicating or the community is too small to give the project any hope of success.

An increasing number of video games companies have been turning to ICOs and token sales in order to raise funding, and GamesIndustry.biz has found the success rate to be considerably higher.

Of the 41 games-related projects we were able to find via Tokendata, only four had failed, suggesting a success rate of 91 per cent.

24 of the games projects we found listed the total raised by the ICO, with six generating over $10 millon. A further five raised over $1 million. Virtual item trading network Wax was the clear leader, having raised $68.4 million, followed by the $53 million raised by mobile gaming platform MobileGo. Gamer reward platform Refereum was the biggest at $30.2 million.

There were a few familiar names among those declaring the amount funded, including Russian games streaming platform Playkey with $10.5 million (which we previously covered), Reality Clash’s $2.56 million (oddly, a little lower than the $3.5 million we previously reported), and CCG game Spells of Genesis with $200,000 (which you can read about in our interview here).

One notable absence from Tokendata’s listings was troubled German studio Crytek, which launched a cryptocurrency towards the end of 2017. However, a visit to the Crycash website shows the token sale was successfully completed, shifting more than seven million virtual coins. (It’s not clear how much real-world money was raised – GamesIndustry.biz has reached out to Crytek for clarification.)

We also found a further 14 games projects on Tokendata that completed their ICOs but have declined to share the total. These ranged from Early Access arena battler Skara and online card game platform Nova Blitz, to various new game development platforms, including Getgame, IZX and Game Com.

Of the titles that completed but did not disclose totals, one appears to have failed: Mainasset, a strategy game built around mining cryptocurrency. Heading over to the game’s website, the creators reveal the project has closed due to insufficient investments.

The other three failures in the games space were game development platform Totum, mobile arena game Battle of Titan, and in-game item marketplace Mold – all of which were unable to raise their targeted funds during their ICO.

It is crucial to note that many of these projects are still in development – indeed some of the token sales we found were completed as recently as the last two months – so there is no guarantee that the companies behind them will be able to build on their cryptocurrency’s success.

Nonetheless, it appears interest among the cryptocurrency community is high for video game projects, bucking the trend in the wider market for ICOs.

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Month: February 2018

Congressman Blames Video Games, Hollywood For Mass Shootings

Posted on February 28, 2018  in Video Games

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month = 1;
year++;
}
makeCalendar(new Date(month + ‘/1/’ + year));
}
},

// Init
init = function() {
$container.addClass(‘gnmCalendar’);
makeCalendar(now);
};

init();

};

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