Category: Video Games

How Video Games Helped Kill Toy’s R’ Us

Posted on September 20, 2017  in Video Games

Toys R’ Us declared bankruptcy Monday, but the batteries powering this bunny went dead a long time ago.

While there are a lot of factors at “play,” a big part of the issue is that the Batman playsets and Barbie dolls have been gathering dust in the rec room as children’s faces are lit by glowing apps and bleeping video games.

Now when you type into Google, “My kid is addicted to…” the top suggested word to fill in the blank is “Minecraft,” followed by sugar, then Xbox, then “Roblox,” another block-building game. That’s right, Minecraft is more addictive than sugar, according to what people are anxiously typing into Google.

Where Did it All Go Wrong?

In 1999, Toys ‘R’ Us was the #2 retailer for video games and software.

Today it accounts for less than 1 percent of the market share, according to research by Niko Partners, a firm specializing in games market analysis.

While you can certainly buy video games at Toys ‘R’ Us, why would you? Customers complain the stores feel dirty, disorganized, overwhelming, and overpriced, especially compared to what you can get online and with less friction.

Toys ‘R’ Us rose to prominence through the 90’s as a “category killer,” providing for even the most demanding kid what specialist toy stores and department stores could not. But it began to lose traction as big box stores expanded, and with the rise of online shopping it ceded ground to Walmart, Target, and Amazon.

Toys Swiped to the Side

“They got stuck in 1985,” Robyn O’Bryan, an author based in Boulder, Colorado and the mother of four children, told NBC News. “I’m kind of surprised they managed to hang on.”

While O’Bryan and other parents say physical toys are still a big deal for younger kids, the iPad and other electronic devices are an irresistible draw. By age seven, most kids these days have largely set aside their physical toys in favor of virtual attractions.

“There’s a thing about being a dad where you can all of a sudden buy these toys, sometimes ones you never had, and play with your kid and revisit childhood,” said Kipp Jarecke-Cheng, a communications chief and father of two from Maplewood, New Jersey. “It’s somewhat bittersweet when they put those things down.”

While Jarecke-Cheng did find himself in a Toys ‘R’ Us recently to look for toys for his soon-to-be three-year-old daughter, purchases for his 6th-grade son primarily come in the form of gift cards to be redeemed inside the Xbox or Steam game systems. Those and App Store dollars aren’t flowing toward Toys ‘R’ Us any more.

According to a study by the Kaiser Family Foundation, 8-18 year-olds are spending nearly 8 hours a day using entertainment media.

Concerned parents have sounded the alarm, setting limits on screen and internet time. The American Pediatrics Association recommends no screen time for children under the age of 18 months and limited screen time for 18-24 months, solely consisting of high-quality programming in the presence of an adult who can talk to the child about what’s going on.

But what if you threw all the rules out?

Megan Zander, a 33-year-old staff writer for CafeMom, tried an experiment with her then three-year-old twin boys. For three days, she let them have as much screen time as they wanted. Frosting cakes in Daniel Tiger, feeding people in Toca Kitchen, making their own hamburger in Lego Duplex (food is favorite topic), they could gorge as much as they wanted.

Part of her wanted to see if they would tire of it if the forbidden fruit aspect was taken away. Another part just wanted a break as a then-freelancing mom working at home.

“I thought they were going to turn into little zombies. They’re going to stop speaking and never want to play with their toys,” Zander said. Instead, “I was able to strike a balance.”

She knows that they’re not equivalent and playing with virtual worlds can’t substitute for the real thing.

“You can build the most beautiful 3-D world, but nothing is going to replace the fine motor or social skills by picking up two blocks and stacking them on top of each other,” said Zander.

Rebuilding a Brand

Toys ‘R’ Us CEO David Brandon said in a statement the bankruptcy protection period will give the company flexibility with its creditors to redesign the in-store shopping experience and pivot towards creating “interactive spaces” that will host birthday parties, product demonstrations, and let employees take toys out of the boxes before purchase. In addition, he said the company had reached out to app developers to start creating augmented reality video games.

“We are confident that these are the right steps to ensure that the iconic Toys ‘R’ Us and Babies ‘R’ Us brands live on for many generations,” said Brandon.

The company confirmed its 1,600 stores will remain open through the holiday season.

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Category: Video Games

Video reportedly shows Russian helicopter firing on war games spectators

Posted on September 20, 2017  in Video Games

MOSCOW – A military helicopter on a rural training exercise in western Russia mistakenly fired rockets at a group of parked vehicles, knocking at least one person to the ground, footage posted by Russian news sites and on social media showed.

A video clip published on Tuesday by the independent news site Fontanka.ru showed a helicopter firing a salvo of rockets at a military truck covered in camouflage netting in open countryside, with three vehicles with no military markings visible, parked a few meters away.

A man in civilian clothes who had been standing close to the truck was engulfed in a cloud of dust. The person filming the clip, who was slightly further away, could be seen sprawled on the ground.

Russia is currently staging the “Zapad 2017” war games in the area, major exercises on NATO’s eastern flank that were inspected on Monday by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Fontanka.ru said the incident occurred on Sept. 18 and left one person with concussion. It did not give details on the source of the video.

A second video from the same location, which was posted on social media by Russian investigative bloggers Conflict Intelligence Team, showed the aftermath, including a smashed window in a white jeep nearest to the truck, and shrapnel damage to the military truck.

Reuters could not independently verify the videos.

The Russian Defence Ministry’s western military district, in a statement cited by Interfax news agency, said that during a training exercise a helicopter’s targeting system had mistakenly acquired a target, but denied anyone had been injured.

The representative cited by Interfax did not say when the incident happened, or where, or if the exercise was part of the “Zapad-2017” war games.

“As a result of a strike by an unguided rocket, a cargo vehicle with no people on board was damaged,” Interfax quoted a representative of the military district as saying.

The Western military district includes north-western Russia and the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad, all areas where the “Zapad-2017” exercises are focused.

Russia’s defense ministry in Moscow did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment. Asked by reporters about the incident, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov referred questions to the defense ministry.

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Category: Video Games

iOS 11 released for iPhones and iPads today, but it’s bad news for video games

Posted on September 20, 2017  in Video Games

iOS 11 rolls out to iPhone and iPad users on Tuesday, providing Apple fans with an overhauled App Store, updated Siri and more.

If you’re dying to know all the features of the operating system update, we’ve got you covered here.

But this isn’t about that. As a passionate video gamer and, more specifically, someone that cares about the history and preservation of them as an art form, I’m worried.

The problem lies with iOS 11 restricting apps to 64-bit software, whereas previous versions permitted 32-bit software.

This is an inevitable change, as it allows Apple to streamline its operating system to run more efficiently.

However, the drawback is that unless every single developer manually updates their app, it’ll become obsolete and no longer accessible to everyone using the platform.

These sorts of threats to video game preservation aren’t new. Whilst the digital age should allow for easier preservation of video games, which is an art form worth preserving like any other, the opposite is the case.

Whilst the process is relatively simple for developers to update their work, many won’t. They’ve likely moved on to new projects, leaving tens of thousands of apps in the dark.

Due to the DRM nature of Apple’s operating system, this renders many titles unobtainable. They will almost certainly be lost forever.

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The average phone user is unlikely to care, as is the typical gamer, but the idea of remembering a game you enjoyed in a decade’s time and being unable to find it again is upsetting to me.

You wouldn’t expect that to be the case for a song, a movie or a TV show.

If you don’t care about ever returning to old games again, iOS 11 should help newer games run more consistently.

As a lover of video games, which I view to be an art form, this trend certainly worries me.

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Category: Video Games

Jump Launches On-Demand, Video Game Subscription Service for Independent Games

Posted on September 20, 2017  in Video Games


          .xn-newslines .xn-distributor{
          display:none;
          }
          .xn-newslines .xn-dateline{
          display:none;
          }
         
      /* ///////// CLIENT-SPECIFIC STYLES ///////// */
        #outlook a{padding: 0;} /* Force Outlook to provide a “view in browser” message */
        .ReadMsgBody{width: 100%;} .ExternalClass{width: 100%;} /* Force Hotmail to display emails at full width */
        .ExternalClass, .ExternalClass p, .ExternalClass span, .ExternalClass font, .ExternalClass td, .ExternalClass div {line-height: 100%;} /* Force Hotmail to display normal line spacing */
        body, table, td, p, a, li, blockquote{-webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%; -ms-text-size-adjust: 100%;} /* Prevent WebKit and Windows mobile changing default text sizes */
        table, td{mso-table-lspace: 0pt; mso-table-rspace: 0pt;} /* Remove spacing between tables in Outlook 2007 and up */
        img{-ms-interpolation-mode: bicubic;} /* Allow smoother rendering of resized image in Internet Explorer */

        /* ///////// RESET STYLES ///////// */
        body{margin: 0; padding: 0;}
        img{border: 0; height: auto; line-height: 100%; outline: none; text-decoration: none;}
        table{border-collapse: collapse !important;}
        body, #bodyTable, #bodyCell{height: 100% !important; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100% !important;}

        /* ///////// TEMPLATE STYLES ///////// */

        /* ========== Page Styles ========== */

        #bodyCell{padding: 20px;}
        #templateContainer{
            width: 600px;
            background-color: #ffffff;
        }

            /**
            * @tip Set the background color and top border for your email. You may want to choose colors that match your company’s branding.
            * @theme page
            */
            body, #bodyTable{
                background-color: #DEE0E2;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the background color and top border for your email. You may want to choose colors that match your company’s branding.
            * @theme page
            */
            #bodyCell{
                border-top: 4px solid #BBBBBB;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the border for your email.
            */
            #templateContainer{
                border: 1px solid #BBBBBB;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for all first-level headings in your emails. These should be the largest of your headings.
            * @style heading 1
            */
            h1{
                color: #404040 !important;
                display: block;
                font-family: ‘Montserrat’, arial, sans-serif, helvetica;
                font-size: 26px;
                font-style: normal;
                font-weight: bold;
                line-height: 100%;
                letter-spacing: normal;
                margin-top: 0;
                margin-right: 0;
                margin-bottom: 10px;
                margin-left: 0;
                text-align: left;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for all second-level headings in your emails.
            * @style heading 2
            */
            h2{
                color: #404040 !important;
                display: block;
                font-family: ‘Montserrat’, arial, sans-serif, helvetica;
                font-size: 20px;
                font-style: normal;
                font-weight: bold;
                line-height: 100%;
                letter-spacing: normal;
                margin-top: 0;
                margin-right: 0;
                margin-bottom: 10px;
                margin-left: 0;
                text-align: left;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for all third-level headings in your emails.
            * @style heading 3
            */
            h3{
                color: #3d98c6 !important;
                display: block;
                font-family: ‘Montserrat’, arial, sans-serif, helvetica;
                font-size: 16px;
                font-weight: normal;
                line-height: 100%;
                letter-spacing: normal;
                margin-top: 0;
                margin-right: 0;
                margin-bottom: 10px;
                margin-left: 0;
                text-align: left;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for all fourth-level headings in your emails. These should be the smallest of your headings.
            * @style heading 4
            */
            h4{
                color: #808080 !important;
                display: block;
                font-family: ‘Montserrat’, arial, sans-serif, helvetica;
                font-size: 14px;
                font-weight: normal;
                line-height: 100%;
                letter-spacing: normal;
                margin-top: 0;
                margin-right: 0;
                margin-bottom: 10px;
                margin-left: 0;
                text-align: left;
            }

            h4.subtitle {
              color: #808080 !important;
              font-size: 14px;
            }

            /* ========== Header Styles ========== */

            /**
            * @tip Set the background color and bottom border for your email’s preheader area.
            * @theme header
            */
            #templatePreheader{
                background-color: #F4F4F4;
                border-bottom: 1px solid #CCCCCC;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s preheader text. Choose a size and color that is easy to read.
            */
            .preheaderContent{
                color: #808080;
                font-family: ‘Montserrat’, arial, sans-serif, helvetica;
                font-size: 10px;
                line-height: 125%;
                text-align: left;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s preheader links. Choose a color that helps them stand out from your text.
            */
            .preheaderContent a:link, .preheaderContent a:visited, /* Yahoo! Mail Override */ .preheaderContent a .yshortcuts /* Yahoo! Mail Override */{
                color: #606060;
                font-weight: normal;
                text-decoration: underline;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the background color and borders for your email’s header area.
            * @theme header
            */
            #templateHeader{
                background-color: #F4F4F4;
                border-top: 1px solid #FFFFFF;
                border-bottom: 1px solid #CCCCCC;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s header text. Choose a size and color that is easy to read.
            */
            .headerContent{
                color: #505050;
                font-family: ‘Montserrat’, arial, sans-serif, helvetica;
                font-size: 20px;
                font-weight: bold;
                line-height: 100%;
                padding-top: 0;
                padding-right: 0;
                padding-bottom: 0;
                padding-left: 0;
                text-align: left;
                vertical-align: middle;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s header links. Choose a color that helps them stand out from your text.
            */
            .headerContent a:link, .headerContent a:visited, /* Yahoo! Mail Override */ .headerContent a .yshortcuts /* Yahoo! Mail Override */{
                color: #3d98c6;
                font-weight: normal;
                text-decoration: underline;
            }

            #headerImage{
                height: auto;
                max-width: 600px;
            }

            #socialShare img {
                margin-right: 3px;
            }

            /* ========== Body Styles ========== */

            /**
            * @tip Set the background color and borders for your email’s body area.
            */
            #templateBody{
                background-color: #FFFFFF;
                border-top: 1px solid #FFFFFF;
                /*border-bottom: 1px solid #CCCCCC;*/
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s main content text. Choose a size and color that is easy to read.
            * @theme main
            */
            .bodyContent{
                color: #505050;
                font-family: ‘Montserrat’, arial, sans-serif, helvetica;
                font-size: 16px;
                line-height: 150%;
                padding-top: 20px;
                padding-right: 20px;
                padding-bottom: 20px;
                padding-left: 20px;
                text-align: left;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s main content links. Choose a color that helps them stand out from your text.
            */
            .bodyContent a:link, .bodyContent a:visited, /* Yahoo! Mail Override */ .bodyContent a .yshortcuts /* Yahoo! Mail Override */{
                color: #3d98c6;
                font-weight: normal;
                text-decoration: underline;
            }

            .bodyContent img{
                display: inline;
                height: auto;
                max-width: 560px;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the background color and border for your email’s data table.
            */
            .templateDataTable{
                background-color: #FFFFFF;
            }

            .templateDataTable a:link {
                text-decoration: none;
                color: #3d98c6;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s data table text. Choose a size and color that is easy to read.
            */
            .dataTableHeading{
                /*background-color: #E7F1FC;*/
                color: #336699;
                font-family: ‘Montserrat’, arial, sans-serif, helvetica;
                font-size: 14px;
                font-weight: bold;
                line-height: 150%;
                text-align: left;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s data table links. Choose a color that helps them stand out from your text.
            */
            .dataTableHeading a:link, .dataTableHeading a:visited, /* Yahoo! Mail Override */ .dataTableHeading a .yshortcuts /* Yahoo! Mail Override */{
                color: #FFFFFF;
                font-weight: bold;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s data table text. Choose a size and color that is easy to read.
            */
            .dataTableContent{
                border-top: 1px solid #DDDDDD;
                border-bottom: 0;
                color: #404040;
                font-family: ‘Montserrat’, arial, sans-serif, helvetica;
                font-size: 12px;
                line-height: 150%;
                text-align: left;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s data table links. Choose a color that helps them stand out from your text.
            */
            .dataTableContent a:link, .dataTableContent a:visited, /* Yahoo! Mail Override */ .dataTableContent a .yshortcuts /* Yahoo! Mail Override */{
                color: #3d98c6;
                font-weight: bold;
            }

            /* ========== Column Styles ========== */

            .templateColumnContainer{width: 200px;}

            /**
            * @tip Set the background color and borders for your email’s column area.
            */
            #templateColumns{
                background-color: #F4F4F4;
                border-top: 1px solid #FFFFFF;
                border-bottom: 1px solid #CCCCCC;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s left column content text. Choose a size and color that is easy to read.
            */
            .leftColumnContent{
                color: #505050;
                font-family: ‘Montserrat’, arial, sans-serif, helvetica;
                font-size: 14px;
                line-height: 150%;
                padding-top: 0;
                padding-right: 20px;
                padding-bottom: 20px;
                padding-left: 20px;
                text-align: left;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s left column content links. Choose a color that helps them stand out from your text.
            */
            .leftColumnContent a:link, .leftColumnContent a:visited, /* Yahoo! Mail Override */ .leftColumnContent a .yshortcuts /* Yahoo! Mail Override */{
                color: #3d98c6;
                font-weight: normal;
                text-decoration: underline;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s center column content text. Choose a size and color that is easy to read.
            */
            .centerColumnContent{
                color: #505050;
                font-family: ‘Montserrat’, arial, sans-serif, helvetica;
                font-size: 14px;
                line-height: 150%;
                padding-top: 0;
                padding-right: 20px;
                padding-bottom: 20px;
                padding-left: 20px;
                text-align: left;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s center column content links. Choose a color that helps them stand out from your text.
            */
            .centerColumnContent a:link, .centerColumnContent a:visited, /* Yahoo! Mail Override */ .centerColumnContent a .yshortcuts /* Yahoo! Mail Override */{
                color: #3d98c6;
                font-weight: normal;
                text-decoration: underline;
            }

            /**
            * @tip Set the styling for your email’s right column content text. Choose a size and color that is easy to read.
            */
            .rightColumnContent{
                color: #505050;
                font-family: ‘Montserrat’, arial, sans-serif, helvetica;
                font-size: 14px;
                line-height: 150%;
                padding-top: 0;
                padding-right: 20px;
                padding-bottom: 20px;
                padding-left: 20px;
                text-align: left;
            }

            /**
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Tech Profile

Username: aronschatz / edit profile

Jump Launches On-Demand, Video Game Subscription Service for Independent Games

Jump’s launch offering includes more than 60 independent game gems for $9.99 a month, featuring a 14-day free trial and unlimited at-your-fingertips play within an ever-growing library

PR Newswire

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 19, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Jump around! Jump Gaming, Inc. today launched Jump, the on-demand video game subscription service, with an emphasis on independent games. Offering gamers a 14-day free trial of the service at http://www.playonjump.com, Jump features a highly curated launch library of more than 60 games, including renowned developers Ed McMillen and Tyler Glaiel’s new game The End Is Nigh and other revered indie titles. The library will continue to grow as new games will be added each month. Jump is playable first on all Windows and Mac desktop systems via a native app, as well as offering Linux and Chrome OS access via web browser.

Anthony Palma, CEO and founder, started Jump with a group of video game industry veterans to leverage their cumulative experience in indie development, publishing, marketing, and distribution. The result is Jump’s unique understanding of the issues these indie studios confront every day.

“As a former indie developer, I learned first-hand what challenges a majority of independent studios were facing regarding distribution and discoverability,” Palma said. “When WebGL exports started popping up in game engines in 2015, we saw the potential that web technologies held for the future. It was then that we had a vision of how this new tech could create a platform that could alleviate some of the problems for indie developers and make their games easily discoverable by gamers searching for cutting-edge content. Enter Jump.”

Using its innovative HyperJump™ delivery technology, the service provides players with the same experience as a game that is fully installed on their machine, but without long download times and without requiring large amounts of disk space. This unique, nonstreaming data-transfer system avoids latency and quality issues that have plagued other game services by sending the game in chunks to a user’s device, and has them playing most games in under a minute. In October, Jump will unveil a new custom-caching system, allowing subscribers to choose how much hard drive space they want to devote to games in Jump so that recently played games load even faster.

Priced at $9.99 a month, players receive unlimited access to the entire library, which is carefully curated based on reviews, awards, and sales to aid gamers in discovering the best in indie games. Along with The End is Nigh, September’s catalog features other exceptional independent game titles such as Pony Island, Diaries of a Spaceport Janitor, The Bridge, Teslagrad, and Beatbuddy. Subscribers can expect approximately 10 new titles on October 1st, and each month following.

Jump will also feature a recommendation engine once it collects player data, which will help gamers discover other indie games they may enjoy based not only on genre, but individual play-style, motivations, and themes. This offers an opportunity for players to find new games to try without committing to any purchases and without in-app transactions or advertising — allowing them to have a seamless and uninterrupted game experience without any risk.

Jump raised $1.9M in Series A funding from prominent angels including board member Montgomery Kersten, Buddy Arnheim of Perkins Coie, and former partners of VC firms investing individually, with previous Seed investments from Boost VC (led by Adam Draper) and Sand Hill Angels. Additionally, Jump is supported by a robust advisory board composed of more than 15 video game industry and Silicon Valley executives including Tom Kalinske (chairman of Gazillion Games and former CEO of Sega), Mike Fischer (former CEO of Square Enix and former head of marketing for Xbox), Louis Castle (founder of Westwood Studios and current head of Amazon Game Studios), Tony Parisi (head of AR/VR at Unity and pioneer of WebGL and VR), and Rick Tallman (COO of Vungle), Mike Williams (former CFO of EA Games Label), and Robert Bowling (newly appointed Head of Publishing at Jump and former VP of Publishing at Humble Bundle). The advisory board believes in the importance of indie games and the opportunity for a subscription service tailored around gamer’s preferences and needs.

“Independent studios are the lifeblood of innovation in the industry,” Tom Kalinske said. “Many of the greatest game developers in the history of video games started out as pioneering indies pushing the boundaries of game-making, storytelling, and technology. Indie studios are able to take risks, be provocative, and drive the industry forward with their creativity and new ideas, and are helpful in getting new gamers, programmers, and artists, working in the industry.”

Advisors also see the shift in consumer buying behavior from physical ownership to content accessibility at any time, and combined with Jump’s tech and indie discoverability goals, made the service an easy choice to get behind. “In my time at Amazon as VP of digital video and MP3, I saw the powerful impact of bringing a subscription service to digital content,” advisor Mike Fischer added. “I had the privilege to work with Tom Kalinske at Sega when he paved the way with the very first service like this with Sega Channel, which was decades ahead of its time. Jump made me confident that we now have both the content and the technology to make this business model work.”

For more information on Jump, please visit http://www.playonjump.com.

Digital press kit (including trailer) available to download here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/xqzjn016tjmw8qs/AAAE9ZP9UJmW-w3MbIYSUbGIa?dl=0

About Jump Gaming, Inc.:
Established in 2015, Jump Gaming, Inc., is a privately held company, with its origins as an independent video game developer — Kermdinger Studios, Inc. — since 2012. Jump Gaming’s products include Jump, an on-demand video-game subscription service with a curated library of game titles that subscribers have unlimited access to for one flat monthly fee. It has offices in San Francisco and Los Angeles.

 

View original content with multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/jump-launches-on-demand-video-game-subscription-service-for-independent-games-300521833.html

SOURCE  Jump Gaming, Inc.

CONTACT: Cindy Lum, Vice President of Communications and Events, cindy@playonjump.com, 650.263.1320

Web Site: http://www.playonjump.com


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Category: Video Games

Fall fare ranges from politics to video games, technology to tomorrow’s jobs

Posted on September 19, 2017  in Video Games

Berkeley — The University of California, Berkeley, is serving up a host of opportunities this fall semester to learn from its experts and visitors about everything from India’s caste system and cleanliness campaign, the rise and fall of good jobs in America, information ethics and tech threats, and the Dalai Lama to virtually all things Trump, as well as race, inequality and the role of resistance in America.

To keep up on activities during Free Speech Year, bookmark this page. For additional event details, consult our campus calendar listings. Meanwhile, check below for events that may stand out to you.

September

California State Treasurer John Chiang will deliver the Michael Nacht Distinguished Lecture in Politics and Public Policy tonight at 6 p.m. in the Alumni House Toll Room. He will explore “The Power of Public Investment: Improving Our Economy, Our Climate and Our Future” and how seemingly mundane financial decisions can impact large-scale change and the quality of life in California.

wind farm in San Gorgonio Pass

California Treasurer talks about the importance of dealing with climate change. (iStock photo.)

Ever wonder why video gamers get so worked up? Katherine Isbister, a human computer interaction and games researcher at UC Santa Cruz, will speak about “How Games Move Us: Emotional Technology by Design” at noon on Wednesday (Sept. 20) at Sutardja Dai Hall’s Banatao Auditorium. The free program is part of the CITRIS Research Exchange series.

Empire of Cotton: The Global Origins of Capitalism is the title of an award-winning book by Harvard University history professor Sven Becker and also the topic of his talk on Thursday at 2 p.m. in Room 370 of Dwinelle Hall. The New York Times called Becker’s book one of the most important books of 2015.

“The Existential Threat of Big Tech” and tools to combat it will be addressed by Franklin Foer, a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a fellow at the New America Foundation, during a 6:30 p.m. conversation with Wired editor Nicholas Thompson at the Berkeley Art Museum Pacific Film Archive on Monday, Sept. 25. Seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. The talk is part of Berkeley’s Art, Technology and Culture Colloquium.

US ConstitutionConstitution Day will be observed on campus in various ways, including a discussion by Erwin Chemerinsky, dean of Berkeley Law, about the book he coauthored, “Free Speech on Campus,” at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 26, in the Morrison Library, near the north entrance to Doe Library.

The Institute for South Asia Studies hosts a Sept. 27 talk at the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues about caste, dignity and Dalit lives in Central Kerala, India, by Stanford anthropologist Sharika Thiranagama. Dalits were once known as the “untouchables” or lower castes in India.

Taking to the podium in Room 112 of Wurster Hall on Thursday, Sept. 28, will be Richard Rothstein, a senior fellow at UC Berkeley’s Haas Institute and a research associate at the Economic Policy Institute. He will talk about his new book, The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How our Government Segregated America. Rothstein will then join Terner Center for Housing Innovation faculty director Carol Galante to discuss his research on how governments violated the U.S. Constitution by explicitly segregating urban areas.

Disengagement, the third installment in a film trilogy by Amos Gitai will screen at Wurster Hall’s Room 112 on Wednesday, Sept. 27. The 2007 film’s title refers to Israeli policies of withdrawing from Gaza and the destruction of illegal settlements in the region’s disputed areas. Gitai, an architect, will discuss his work with Francesco Spagnolo, curator of the Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life at UC Berkeley.

Burma will be the topic of a lecture on Sept. 27 in Room 180 of Doe Library by Maitrii Aung-Thwin, an associate professor of Myanmar/Southeast Asian history at the National University of Singapore.

“Liberalism, War and the Invention of National Security” is the title of a talk at Moses Hall on Sept. 28 by Andrew Preston, a professor of American history at Cambridge University.

October

Resistance today is the topic of the annual Mario Savio Memorial Lecture, set for 8 p.m. on Oct. 8. The talk in the Pauley Ballroom of the ASUC Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union by Annie Leonard, executive director of Greenpeace USA, will be free and open to the public.

Award-winning author and documentary film maker Laleh Khadvi will be the guest of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies on Oct. 4, when she will discuss her novel, A Good Country, about the progression of a young son of Iranian immigrants from a California surfer dude to a terrorist.

Stephen Engblom, senior vice president and global director of AECOM Cities, which boasts a “whole-systems approach to better prioritize projects, plan ahead, protect vulnerable assets and provide sustainable growth,” will address the timely topic of making cities resilient on Oct. 6 for a Department of Architecture lecture at Wurster Hall.

The 2018 California Gubernatorial Race: An Overview will be addressed by experts assembled by UC Berkeley’s Institute of Governmental Studies at 4 p.m. on Oct. 11 at the IGS Library in Moses Hall. They will consider major policy distinctions between the leading candidates, key campaign issues and how much the national Republican brand may hurt Republican candidates in California.

Arlie Hochschild, a professor of the Graduate School, sociologist and author, will deliver the Bernard Moses Memorial Lecture on Oct. 11 at International House, discussing the preparation and research for her latest book, Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right, and questions about “climbing an empathy wall” to understand others.

Isha Ray and C. Sharada Prasad will talk about a major undertaking in India to boost sanitation.

The Swachh Barat Mission, a massive drive by India’s government to improve sanitation on the country’s streets, roads and infrastructure, is the nation’s biggest cleanliness campaign – with 3 million government employees participating in the effort to construct individual, cluster and community toilets and achieve an “open defecation-free India” by October 2019. UC Berkeley water specialists Isha Ray and C. Sharada Prasad assess the mission’s success in a 5 p.m. talk at Stephens Hall on Oct. 12.

Is NATO obsolete? Ambassador Douglas Lute, former U.S. permanent representative to the North Atlantic Council, NATO’s standing political body, will discuss this question in a talk at Moses Hall, also on Oct. 12.

Synthetic biology and new material systems will be explored by Martyn Dade-Robertson on Oct. 18, when he is the featured lecturer for an architecture lecture series at Wurster Hall. Dade-Robertson heads the United Kingdom-based Synbio.Construction initiative, which aims “to create new living building technologies which are responsive, intelligent and self-constructing.”

Making America Small Again? Josef Joffe, editor and publisher of the German newspaper Die Zeit, will explore that question, as well as Donald Trump’s threat to liberal order and the future prospects for American power in a 4 p.m. Oct. 18 talk at the IGS Library in Moses Hall.

Scholar Robert Thurman.

Robert Thurman, a renowned authority on Buddhism, will discuss the Dalai Lama when he delivers the inaugural lecture on religion in the modern world, sponsored by the Institute for South Asia Studies and the Vedanta Society Berkeley, on Oct. 18 in Sibley Auditorium. Thurman is a Columbia University professor of Buddhist studies, author of numerous books on Buddhism and a leading American expert on Tibetan Buddhism. The program is free and open to the public.

The subject of resistance reappears in an Oct. 19 talk by Darrick Hamilton of The New School, when he discusses “A Bold Plan for Work with Dignity via a Federal Job Guarantee” in the Maude Fife Room at Wheeler Hall. Hamilton, an associate professor of economic and urban policy, contends that movements such as Fight for $15 don’t go far enough, especially for those stigmatized by race, disability or having been incarcerated. His talk is cosponsored by the economics department and UC Berkeley’s Institute for Research on Labor and Employment. Register here to reserve a spot.

The aesthetics of information ethics and socially engaged internet art will be the topic of a talk by artist, “hactivist” and cultural critic Paolo Cirio on Oct. 23. Cirio is said to often be subjected to investigations, legal and personal threats by governmental and military authorities, multinationals, global banks, law firms and even crowds of ordinary people due to his artworks, which have unsettled institutions such as Facebook, Amazon, Google, NATO and others. He will be a guest of the Berkeley Center for New Media and the Arts, Technology and Culture Colloquia.

(iStock photo.)

What will work look like in the future? Annette Bernhardt, director of the Low-wage Work Program at the Labor Center (part of UC Berkeley’s Institute for Research on Labor and Employment) will share her thoughts on the question in a noon talk on Oct. 25 at IRLE, 2521 Channing Way. Bernhardt’s research on the gig economy has raised interesting questions.

UC Berkeley political scientist Aila Matanock will discuss her new book, Electing Peace, in an Oct. 25 talk at Moses Hall. The book presents Matanock’s theory explaining the causes and consequences of civil conflict settlement provisions that let the combatants participate as political parties in post-conflict elections. She will be the guest of the Center for Latin American Studies.

“Conversations on the Small Screen: Talking over Social Media” will be the subject of an Oct. 25 talk at International House by linguist Deborah Tannen of Georgetown University. The Charles M. and Martha Hitchcock Lecture will examine how social media is changing relationships and amplifying risks as well as benefits of voice-to-voice conversations. The event will be free and open to the public.

November

Author Rosa Brooks.

How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything is the subject of a Nov. 2 talk at Moses Hall by Rosa Brooks and is the title of a book by Brooks, a journalist, Georgetown University law professor, daughter of left-wing anti-war activists and the wife of a U.S. Army Special Forces officer. She will be the guest of the Institute of International Studies.

Jobs is always a hot topic and a talk by Rick Wartzman, director of the K.H. Moon Center for a Functioning Society at the Drucker Institute, should draw a crowd with his address on “The End of Loyalty: The Rise and Fall of Good Jobs in America” at 4 p.m. on Nov. 2 at the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Advance registration is recommended.

A day-long conference at UC Berkeley’s School of Law on Nov. 3 will explore the meaning of federalism today and what rules and principles might guide federal policy moving forward. California Supreme Court Chief Justice Tani G. Catil-Sakauye will deliver the keynote address.

Michael Rock’s talk at BAMPFA on Nov. 6 about architecture and design should provoke conversation. “Design solidifies, and naturalizes, things that start off as opinions, stories and traditions and so supplies the form to the fictions by which we live,” says Rock. “But while we tend to think that design exists to serve us, the reverse is true: Once established, it’s almost impossible to think outside the systems and structures we create to frame our lives.”  Rock is a founding partner and creative director 2×4 Inc., a multi-disciplinary design studio in New York City, and directs the Graphic Architecture Project at the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation.

The California Policy Lab is hosting a Nov. 7 conference on “Breaking the Cycle” to share lessons learned by the state’s cities and counties in identifying and dealing with the Californians who are frequent users of government services in hospitals, jails, shelters and elsewhere. Some current efforts focus on holistic health care, while others are testing new diversion options or trying out housing-first models.

California’s governor’s race and its new electorate will be the subject of a conversation hosted by IGS at the IGS Library in Moses Hall at 4 p.m. on Nov. 8.

The prize-winning journalist, novelist, playwright and New Yorker writer George Packer will come to International House on Nov. 15 to deliver the Jefferson Memorial Lecture on the American identity in the age of Trump. A Bay Area native, Packer suggests that no current narratives of national identity point to a way out and he considers other ways to think of being American.

“The New Nationalism and Universities: Global Perspectives on Politics and Policy and the Future of Higher Education” will be examined in a Nov. 16-17 conference organized by the Center for Studies in Higher Education based at UC Berkeley’s Goldman School of Public Policy. Specific topics will include understanding Brexit; American universities in the Trump age; populism and student movements; Russian universities in the age of Putin; China’s universities; the future of European higher education; and rising forms of nationalism.

Josh Kun reports that The California Pioneers music cover depicts two rifle-holding explorers, , mountains, wilderness and pine trees on the cover. Published in 1852, it claimed to be the first piece of music published in California. (Image coutesy of the Public Knowledge project.)

San Francisco’s gentrification as revealed through music will be the subject of a Nov. 20 presentation titled Hit Parade: Music as Public Knowledge. Josh Kun, a University of Southern California professor of communication, American Studies and ethnicity, looks at how popular music can help tell the stories of displacement in the Western Addition, Bayview Hunters Point and Mission District.

His research is part of a collaboration between the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and San Francisco Public Library.

Francis Fukuyama, a prolific writer about international politics and development, will talk about state-building and political development in U.S. foreign policy in an address on Nov. 30 at Alumni House. Fukuyama’s most recent book was Political Order and Political Decay: From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalization of Democracy (2014).

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Category: Video Games

Tracing the path an Israeli folk song took to end up in Japanese video games

Posted on September 19, 2017  in Video Games

This week the folks at Public Radio International dug into an old mystery: how, exactly, did the old Israeli folk song “Mayim, Mayim” make its way into Japanese pop culture — and from there, into Japanese video games like Sexy Parodius?

It’s an interesting bit of mystery tied to the game industry’s history, a mystery revived this summer by a Tablet magazine article on the topic. If you’re not familiar with the song, you might recognize it in some curious places: the background of one stage in Konami’s Sexy Parodius, for example, or in the menu music of Nintendo’s Game Boy Camera.

The Tablet article traces “Mayim, Mayim” back to noted 20th century Israeli composer (and the country’s first Minister of Music Education) Emanuel Amiran-Pougatchov, and suggests that it may have been introduced into Japan after World War II by a well-traveled folk dance scholar, Rickey Holden, who had been to Israel and later traveled to Japan and taught folk dances as part of a post-war cultural exchange program.

Both PRI and the Tablet article acknowledge that this is effectively an educated guess, as there’s no hard evidence of how or when “Mayim, Mayim” became popular in Japan.

“Folk dance has always been done in Japan. It is not only during occupation that it was introduced,” Boston University’s Merry White, who teaches contemporary Japanese cultural anthropology, told PRI. “So, it’s not brand new, but it was revived after American interventions.”

What iknown is that it’s now a relatively well-known folk song in the country, one that’s commonly performed by Japanese students — some of whom likely grew up to be game developers.

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Category: Video Games

Video Games Review: The Walking Dead franchise • Telltale Games

Posted on September 19, 2017  in Video Games

The Walking Dead series is the best-known franchise from Telltale Games. It mirrors the popular comic book and television series, allowing players to enter the zombie apocalypse world of The Walking Dead, as they fight zombies and make decisions that affect the game’s storyline.

Telltale Games is known for popularizing story-based episodic gameplay, giving players a more cinematic experience in their games. Their games use a mechanic similar to the “butterfly effect,” which allows the player to make choices that can alter the outcome of the story. This, in turn, gives the player a sense of responsibility for their actions. Although they have acquired the rights to create games based on successful franchises like Game of Thrones and Batman, the series that led to their breakthrough success is The Walking Dead.

With its fourth season announced for 2018, now is as good as a time as any to look back at what makes this series so memorable.

Season one of Telltale’s The Walking Dead follows the story of Lee Everett at the start of the apocalypse. He’s an ex-prisoner who is now given a second chance at life as he tries to survive in the post-apocalyptic world with his group and a little girl he rescued named Clementine.

This is the first game in the series and it leaves a deep impression on the players because of the likability of the characters, and because of the choices the player is forced to make. Some of these decisions are truly soul-tearing, since just one button can determine whether a character survives or not. These decisions are even more trying once the characters start forming genuine relationships with each other, such as the strong familial bond between Lee and Clementine.

Season two continues the story through the eyes of Clementine, now slightly older and wiser. She is brought in by another group after being abandoned, and is soon forced to contend with a murderer hunting the group.

While the gameplay is quite similar to the first season, the story takes a much darker tone by putting Clementine and her group through many grim situations. Players rarely have a calm moment. While the side characters aren’t as memorable, the game is a lot more intense and the player gets a sense of pride as they watch Clementine grow and become stronger.

Season three of The Walking Dead changes its focus to a character named Javier Garcia who has been on the move to avoid Walkers and to protect his family, until they are separated and have to deal with a cult-like group known as the New Frontier.

Unlike the first two seasons, this game does not follow a linear narrative. The player gets to see Javier’s life before and during the apocalypse through a series of flashbacks and they play a role as to how Javier reacts to certain scenarios in the present. While Clementine is a side character in this season, the player still gets to watch Javier and Clementine’s friendship grow as they slowly become the adults they have to be.

A lot of the plot is left ambiguous to avoid spoilers, but the journey is truly best experienced. All the games have an underlying ray of hope amidst the decay and chaos, and that’s what makes The Walking Dead so memorable. Nothing lasts forever, neither the bad nor the good. The video games are filled with morally grey areas and we are sometimes left to wonder how much we are ready to risk before we lose our humanity.

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Category: Video Games

When video games do Lara Croft better than Hollywood can

Posted on September 19, 2017  in Video Games

Video games get a lot of flack — particularly from “higher” forms of media, like film — for their treatment of women.

These criticisms aren’t unfounded. As an industry, games have a long way to go and a unique set of challenges before it fixes all the deep-rooted issues with portraying women as tantalizing slabs of meat for men to gawk at.

But it might be time for Hollywood to get off its high horse and reckon with its own pretty abysmal objectification of women. 

After all, film was the original medium to spark the term the “male gaze.” Coined by feminist critic Laura Mulvey, it describes how shots and camera angles are almost always entrenched in viewing the world (and women in particular) from male perspectives.

The latest poster for the Tomb Raider movie reboot, starring Ex Machina actress Alicia Vikander, makes it seem like Hollywood now has a thing or two to learn from video games on this front.

The poster sees Vikander striking a very typical ‘Badass Lady’ pose. But it’d feel a lot more empowering to us lady folk if it’s main focus wasn’t squarely centered around her prominent derriere. 

Sticking out your ass is *integral* to tomb raiding

Sticking out your ass is *integral* to tomb raiding

Image: warner bros.

Don’t get us wrong: Vikander looks rad as hell, and we’re glad her rippling (likely digital) muscles are also heavily featured in the shot. But the character of Lara Croft has come a long way since her origins as a boobified female action game heroine, created as a fantasy plaything for teenaged boys. And to be fair, this film poster has come a long way from the days of Angelina Jolie as Lara Croft, too.

But it still undermines much of the progress that video games have worked hard to make in terms of their approach to Lara Croft as a character. In the recent reboot series by Crystal Dynamics, Lara is far beyond serving as a pair of tits and ass. This early look at Hollywood’s approach doesn’t bode well for Warner Bros. picking up that mantle.

Just look at the posters for the 2013 video game reboots as a comparison:

No time for booty poppin' for this Lara Croft

No time for booty poppin’ for this Lara Croft

Image: Crystal dynamics

Cover art for the Definitive Edition of Tomb Raider 2013

Cover art for the Definitive Edition of Tomb Raider 2013

Image: crystal dynamics

In both images, Lara is not striking some ass-front pose that’s all too familiar for action heroines. Neither make this professional tomb raider seem like she’s posing for the cover of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit edition.

Instead, the images feature her in active poses, either about to slice some dude’s neck with an arrow or actually covering her famed chest size to put pressure on an open wound. Both focus on her actual badassary, rather than just her assary.

Then there’s the cover art of 2016’s Rise of the Tomb Raider, which goes to even greater lengths to not objectify its protagonist:

Rise of the Tomb Raider cover art

Rise of the Tomb Raider cover art

Image: CRYSTAL DYNAMICS

Again, Lara Croft is shown in action rather than passively striking a luring pose that only feeds into male concepts of female empowerment. I mean, you can barely even recognize that it’s Lara in the 2nd shot for the video game poster.

Finally, there’s the cover art to the 20 Year Celebration version of Rise of the Tomb Raider. A comparison of this poster with Lara’s male counterpart from the Uncharted action adventure series just goes to show you the effort the industry is making to ensure female protagonists get equal treatment.

Lara Croft vs Nathan Drake

Lara Croft vs Nathan Drake

Image: crystal dynamics and naughty dog

It’s a rare occasion when a medium as old as film must take lessons from a medium as new as video games. 

To be fair, the video game series hasn’t always gotten it right. A look back at 2008’s Tomb Raider: Underworld shows a Lara Croft who is literally just a pair of boobs, thighs, and ass — while removing her face entirely. If that’s not reducing women to a bunch of body parts, I don’t know what is.

But we’re just hoping Warner Bros. doesn’t erase all the progress made by games to cast Lara in a new light, as an actual person rather than just a dude’s wet dream. 

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Category: Video Games

Leftist Politics In Video Games May Be Hurting The Game Developers Conference

Posted on September 19, 2017  in Video Games

The annual Game Developers Conference may be developing a bad reputation as some of its most prominent backers deepen their embrace of progressive politics and promote it as an event that supports their ideology.

This year, video game developers were encouraged to identify their gender pronouns and treated to a host of speeches about diversity and sexism in video games.

This perception may have caused prospective Dutch game developers to have an active disinterest in going, prompting a sponsorship program that funds their visits to end.

While the GDC is made up of hundreds of speeches about different legitimate topics on making games, the stories that get the most play — at least in the progressive gaming press — consist of the political talks with only a few dozen attendees. Tech websites like Engadget carried stories like “GDC opens its arms up to the trans community.” And the GDC Vault, which hosts some of the talks, features presentations like “Misogyny, Racism and Homophobia: Where Do Video Games Stand” and “Creating Safe Spaces at Game Events” ahead of more development-oriented topics.

This year, GDC hosted a talk called “End White Cis Gender Able Bodied Man as the Default.”

Outsiders have the impression that all anyone talks about at GDC is politics.

In a series of tweets Monday, Dutch game developer and co-owner of indie games publisher Vlambeer, Rami Ismail, announced that the program to fund students’ visits to GDC has ended. It is because interest in event among game design students and prospective developers in the Netherlands’ flourishing video game development scene is almost nonexistent.

Rami Ismail, who has been a major proponent of social justice in video games, wrote on Twitter: “The Dutch program to fund students wanting to visit GDC (which Vlambeer also sponsored) has ended because there were not enough applicants.”

“If there’s more disappointing outcomes for this than ‘Dutch students didn’t care to write an essay for a shot to go to GDC’ I don’t know it,” he continued, linking to an article about the fund’s cancellation. “The fund was promoted via most/all major schools and universities, and via the well-circulated national industry magazine.”

The fund’s closure is an unfortunate outcome given the wealth of knowledge that students could have learned from veteran game developers at the event.

“I wish them the best of luck in the industry, then,” Ismail concluded. “Opportunities are rare enough that missing easy ones is not something you should do.”

Given Ismail’s vocal embrace of progressivism, and the high-profile nature of the many leftist lectures that take place at GDC, it’s no surprise that students do not believe that attending the event will help them make better games.

Ian Miles Cheong is a journalist and outspoken media critic. You can reach him through social media at @stillgray on Twitter and on Facebook.

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Category: Video Games

NeuroPlus Brain-Training Video Games Help Students With ADHD, According to Study By Duke University Researcher

Posted on September 19, 2017  in Video Games

DURHAM, N.C., Sept. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — NeuroPlus Inc., a Durham, N.C., startup developing brain-training technology to improve cognitive skills with video games, today announced a pilot study which showed that children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)  demonstrated greater focus and decreased hyperactivity and impulsivity after training on the NeuroPlus video games system. The study, which also confirmed the product’s safety, was recently presented at the 6th World Congress on ADHD in Vancouver.

“Parents were asking how we could use our technology to help improve attention and self-control, so NeuroPlus was created with the primary focus to develop a solution that children are comfortable with: video games,” said NeuroPlus chief executive officer Jake Stauch. “We’re excited to see these results, showing NeuroPlus could address the needs of parents hoping to reduce inattention and hyperactivity in their children while also giving anyone, regardless of age, a way to sharpen and improve their focus.”

The study, “Efficacy of a combined neurofeedback, biofeedback and go/no-go training intervention for ADHD: a randomized controlled trial,” was led by Dr. Sandeep Vaishnavi, a neuropsychiatrist at Duke University’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and director of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic at Carolina Partners in Mental Healthcare. Sixty participants aged 8 to 13 years old with ADHD were enrolled in the study, and subjects were randomly assigned to either 30 minutes of NeuroPlus training 3 times per week or a treatment-as-usual control group that continued their existing treatment regimen. The study lasted 10 weeks, and assessments administered before and after treatment showed improvements in the NeuroPlus group relative to the treatment-as-usual controls.

Statistically significant improvements were observed across multiple outcome measures, including the Conners Global Index (p = 0.010, Cohen’s d = 0.76), Conners Inattention subscale (p = 0.013, Cohen’s d = 0.73), Conners Hyperactivity/Impulsivity subscale (p = 0.040, Cohen’s d = 0.60), and the Quotient ADHD System Global Score (p = 0.005, Cohen’s d = 0.90). No adverse events were reported in the study.

“These results are very promising,” said Dr. Vaishnavi. “There is need to continue this course of study, but this type of training shows promising options for families looking for alternatives to support individuals with ADHD.”

NeuroPlus video games are available on iOS and Android devices and require a special EEG headset and monthly subscription. The games encourage users to focus and sit still through cognitive training tasks. For example, in the Axon game, players focus and sit still to help fly a dragon. The higher the focus, as measured through the EEG headset, the faster the dragon will fly. If a user moves around or loses focus, they lose control of the dragon.

Perquita Peña, a mother of twins with ADHD, has been a NeuroPlus user since January 2017. “I’m so impressed with the drastic changes that I’ve seen with my children’s grades since they started using NeuroPlus,” said Peña. “We don’t use medications because of the side effects, and we’re grateful to have something that really works and is fun for them.”

NeuroPlus was founded by Jake Stauch, who has more than 7 years experience in leading neuro-tech companies. He also previously worked as a researcher at the Duke Center for Cognitive Neuroscience. Stauch is passionate about using brain-training technologies to help people live their best lives with better focus and attention spans.

“Alongside a healthy lifestyle that includes proper sleep, diet, and exercise, we’re excited that NeuroPlus can make a difference for anyone looking to improve their focus and self-control,” said Stauch.

NeuroPlus is not meant to be a treatment for ADHD, nor is it marketed for those purposes.

About NeuroPlusNeuroPlus Inc. develops brain-sensing technology and training applications to improve cognitive performance in children and adults. Founded by leading neuroscientists and game designers, NeuroPlus is committing to creating programs that improve mental well-being while engaging and entertaining customers. NeuroPlus products are not intended to treat or diagnose any disease.

CONTACT:Jill Rountree
Consort Partners for NeuroPlus
210-602-4245
neuroplus@consortpartners.com

View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/neuroplus-brain-training-video-games-help-students-with-adhd-according-to-study-by-duke-university-researcher-300521203.html

SOURCE NeuroPlus Inc.

Copyright (C) 2017 PR Newswire. All rights reserved

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