Category: Video Games

Video: Making better games through neuroscience– and good UX

Posted on August 17, 2017  in Video Games

User experience (UX) and neuroscience are becoming trendy topics in the game industry, sure — but how can these disciplines concretely help you make your game?

That’s the question Epic Games’ Celia Hodent sought to answer when she took the stage at GDC 2015 to talk about how game designers can leverage neuroscience to design better games.

She outlined how a basic study of neuroscience and good UX can provide very concrete and easy-to-use insights you can apply to anticipate and solve design problems, sometimes even before the playtesting phase.

Hodent believes that by having a general understanding of how the brain works and by following UX guidelines, designers increase the chance of their audience experiencing the intended design.

Her talk included fun brain facts and UX tips illustrated by examples from various titles, so if you missed it back in 2015 now is a great time to watch it for free on the official GDC YouTube channel!

In addition to this presentation, the GDC Vault and its new YouTube channel offers numerous other free videos, audio recordings, and slides from many of the recent Game Developers Conference events, and the service offers even more members-only content for GDC Vault subscribers.

Those who purchased All Access passes to recent events like GDC, GDC Europe, and GDC Next already have full access to GDC Vault, and interested parties can apply for the individual subscription via a GDC Vault subscription page. Group subscriptions are also available: game-related schools and development studios who sign up for GDC Vault Studio Subscriptions can receive access for their entire office or company by contacting staff via the GDC Vault group subscription page. Finally, current subscribers with access issues can contact GDC Vault technical support.

Gamasutra and GDC are sibling organizations under parent UBM Americas

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Category: Video Games

Using YouTube as an Accelerant for Video Games

Posted on August 17, 2017  in Video Games

… of video sites like YouTube as an accelerant for the video game business. Big-budget video game studios are … PewDiePie video, Mr. Clark estimated the total value of the video at … channels that focus on specific games can grow alongside them, creating …
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Category: Video Games

Podcast: Remakes, remasters and ports — reimagining video games

Posted on August 17, 2017  in Video Games

On this episode of the Emerald Podcast Network, Mathew Brock and Eric Schucht discuss the differences between video game remakes, remasters and ports. Their discussion covers such classics as Starcraft to Crash Bandicoot and includes their favorite and least liked modern adaptations of nostalgic, classic games.n this episode of the Emerald Podcast Network, Mathew Brock and Eric Schucht discuss the differences between video game remakes, remasters and ports. Their discussion covers such classics as Starcraft to Crash Bandicoot and includes their favorite and least liked modern adaptations of nostalgic, classic games.

This episode was produced by Alec Cowan.

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Category: Video Games

Hayley Wickenheiser backs development of video games to treat concussions

Posted on August 17, 2017  in Video Games

Hayley Wickenheiser’s reasons for helping develop video game technology to treat concussions are close to her heart.

The four-time Olympic gold medallist in women’s hockey remembers the dizziness and nausea she felt after taking a hit in a Swedish men’s pro league in 2008.

Wickenheiser also witnessed the deterioration of friend and former NHL player Steve Montador, who was diagnosed after his death in 2015 with chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

CTE is a degenerative brain condition that doctors believe is caused by concussions.

Wickenheiser co-chairs the advisory board of Highmark Interactive, a Toronto digital therapeutics company developing video games to diagnose and treat concussion and brain injuries.

She’s joined on the board by former New Jersey Devils captain Bryce Salvador, snowboarder Mark McMorris and Pittsburgh Penguins director of sport science Andy O’Brien.

Honouring Montador

“Everyone involved with this project had a bit of a connection to head trauma in some way shape or form,” Wickenheiser said in an interview. “Losing Steve Montador who was one of my best friends to . . . he obviously had CTE which we found out after he passed away. Watching him degrade as a person over the years, I think looking back after he passed away, I felt ‘Is there something I can do to honour Steve that will be to continue down this road and help other people?”‘

Highmark is 12 to 18 months away from going to market with the games, according to founder Dr. Sanjeev Sharma.

“Our fundamental thesis is between neuroplasticity, where the brain does heal itself, and the proper utilization of gaming and the stimulus that gaming provides the brain, we believe we can build a game that will eventually enable the concussed individual to heal faster, quicker, better,” Sharma explained. “We don’t look to replace physicians or clinicians. We’re looking to give them tools to augment diagnostic capabilities.”

The traditional remedy for a concussion has been to eliminate physical activity and limit sensory stimuli until the brain is healed. New research suggests some physical activity helps recovery.

Playing a video game with a brain injury may seem counterintuitive given sensitivity to light and screens, but Sharma believes games could retrain and thus restore the concussed brain.

“The hope would be, eventually, we would have a game that, depending on symptoms, patients could play and it would help raise their threshold for what they can do on a computer screen before they have symptoms,” he said. “Slowly and gradually we’d raise that threshold to bring it back to normal.

“You use games that aren’t as intrusive or games where you have different speeds at which things are moving and things are flashing. What you’re doing is you’re really slowly building up their tolerance where all of a sudden computer screens don’t cause a problem because they’ve been using gaming to get better.”

In practical terms, instead of sitting in a dark room between physiotherapy and rehabilitation appointments, Wickenheiser believes the ability to augment and chart recovery doing something fun at home could accelerate return to play or work.

Fighting on multiple fronts

“I’ve had teammates who have had to literally go home and sit in the dark. I was through that once myself for a short time,” she said. “One of the things that happens when you have a head injury, you often don’t know how much better you’re getting and there’s a feeling of hopelessness and fear that comes with that.

“If you’re tracking yourself on a day-to-day basis and seeing improvement or know you’re helping yourself improve, I think it also helps with the recovery because the stress level goes down.”

The 39-year-old from Shaunavon, Sask., retired as Canada’s all-time leading scorer in January.

The women’s team congregated in Calgary this week to start full-time preparation for the upcoming Winter Olympics. Wickenheiser did that five times in her career en route to four gold.

“I’ll say it’s definitely a little strange for sure because you’re used to the routine,” she said. “I’m so busy with other stuff right now, I’m filling the gap.”

Wickenheiser will join San Jose Sharks centre Logan Couture and former NHL player Eric Lindros at Western University in London, Ont., on Wednesday to speak at and promote the school’s concussion treatment and awareness program.

She’s fighting the concussion battle on multiple fronts.

“I’m a big believer that academia alone isn’t going to get this done,” she said. “I think we need the private sector.

“There’s just so much more we can develop and I think we can make people aware of.”

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Category: Video Games

Hayley Wickenheiser backs concussion video games: ‘There’s just so much more we can develop’

Posted on August 17, 2017  in Video Games

Hayley Wickenheiser‘s reasons for helping develop video game technology to treat concussions are close to her heart.

The four-time Olympic gold medallist in women’s hockey remembers the dizziness and nausea she felt after taking a hit in a Swedish men’s pro league in 2008.

Wickenheiser also witnessed the deterioration of friend and former NHL player Steve Montador, who was diagnosed after his death in 2015 with chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

CTE is a degenerative brain condition that doctors believe is caused by concussions.


READ MORE:
Star athletes attend concussion symposium at Western University

Wickenheiser co-chairs the advisory board of Highmark Interactive, a Toronto digital therapeutics company developing video games to diagnose and treat concussion and brain injuries.

She’s joined on the board by former New Jersey Devils captain Bryce Salvador, snowboarder Mark McMorris and Pittsburgh Penguins director of sport science Andy O’Brien.

WATCH: New concussion recommendations






Story continues below

“Everyone involved with this project had a bit of a connection to head trauma in some way shape or form,” Wickenheiser said in an interview. “Losing Steve Montador who was one of my best friends to . . . he obviously had CTE which we found out after he passed away. Watching him degrade as a person over the years, I think looking back after he passed away, I felt ‘Is there something I can do to honour Steve that will be to continue down this road and help other people?’”

Highmark is 12 to 18 months away from going to market with the games, according to founder Dr. Sanjeev Sharma.

“Our fundamental thesis is between neuroplasticity, where the brain does heal itself, and the proper utilization of gaming and the stimulus that gaming provides the brain, we believe we can build a game that will eventually enable the concussed individual to heal faster, quicker, better,” Sharma explained. “We don’t look to replace physicians or clinicians. We’re looking to give them tools to augment diagnostic capabilities.”


READ MORE:
Hayley Wickenheiser receives honorary University of Saskatchewan degree

The traditional remedy for a concussion has been to eliminate physical activity and limit sensory stimuli until the brain is healed. New research suggests some physical activity helps recovery.

Playing a video game with a brain injury may seem counterintuitive given sensitivity to light and screens, but Sharma believes games could retrain and thus restore the concussed brain.

WATCH: Advice to Canada’s flag bearer: Don’t trip





“The hope would be, eventually, we would have a game that, depending on symptoms, patients could play and it would help raise their threshold for what they can do on a computer screen before they have symptoms,” he said. “Slowly and gradually we’d raise that threshold to bring it back to normal.

“You use games that aren’t as intrusive or games where you have different speeds at which things are moving and things are flashing. What you’re doing is you’re really slowly building up their tolerance where all of a sudden computer screens don’t cause a problem because they’ve been using gaming to get better.”


READ MORE:
Canadian women’s hockey star Hayley Wickenheiser announces retirement

In practical terms, instead of sitting in a dark room between physiotherapy and rehabilitation appointments, Wickenheiser believes the ability to augment and chart recovery doing something fun at home could accelerate return to play or work.

“I’ve had teammates who have had to literally go home and sit in the dark. I was through that once myself for a short time,” she said.

“One of the things that happens when you have a head injury, you often don’t know how much better you’re getting and there’s a feeling of hopelessness and fear that comes with that.

“If you’re tracking yourself on a day-to-day basis and seeing improvement or know you’re helping yourself improve, I think it also helps with the recovery because the stress level goes down.”

The 39-year-old from Shaunavon, Sask., retired as Canada’s all-time leading scorer in January.

WATCH: Hayley Wickenheiser hangs up her skates





The women’s team congregated in Calgary this week to start full-time preparation for the upcoming Winter Olympics. Wickenheiser did that five times in her career en route to four gold.


READ MORE:
Female coach in NHL is just a question of timing

“I’ll say it’s definitely a little strange for sure because you’re used to the routine,” she said. “I’m so busy with other stuff right now, I’m filling the gap.”

Wickenheiser will join San Jose Sharks centre Logan Couture and former NHL player Eric Lindros at Western University in London, Ont., on Wednesday to speak at and promote the school’s concussion treatment and awareness program.

She’s fighting the concussion battle on multiple fronts.

“I’m a big believer that academia alone isn’t going to get this done,” she said. “I think we need the private sector.”

“There’s just so much more we can develop and I think we can make people aware of.”


Go to Source

[Top]

Category: Video Games

Wickenheiser backs concussion video games

Posted on August 17, 2017  in Video Games

Hayley Wickenheiser‘s reasons for helping develop video game technology to treat concussions are close to her heart.

The four-time Olympic gold medallist in women’s hockey remembers the dizziness and nausea she felt after taking a hit in a Swedish men’s pro league in 2008.

Wickenheiser also witnessed the deterioration of friend and former NHL player Steve Montador, who was diagnosed after his death in 2015 with chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

CTE is a degenerative brain condition that doctors believe is caused by concussions.


READ MORE:
Star athletes attend concussion symposium at Western University

Wickenheiser co-chairs the advisory board of Highmark Interactive, a Toronto digital therapeutics company developing video games to diagnose and treat concussion and brain injuries.

She’s joined on the board by former New Jersey Devils captain Bryce Salvador, snowboarder Mark McMorris and Pittsburgh Penguins director of sport science Andy O’Brien.

WATCH: New concussion recommendations






Story continues below

“Everyone involved with this project had a bit of a connection to head trauma in some way shape or form,” Wickenheiser said in an interview. “Losing Steve Montador who was one of my best friends to . . . he obviously had CTE which we found out after he passed away. Watching him degrade as a person over the years, I think looking back after he passed away, I felt ‘Is there something I can do to honour Steve that will be to continue down this road and help other people?’”

Highmark is 12 to 18 months away from going to market with the games, according to founder Dr. Sanjeev Sharma.

“Our fundamental thesis is between neuroplasticity, where the brain does heal itself, and the proper utilization of gaming and the stimulus that gaming provides the brain, we believe we can build a game that will eventually enable the concussed individual to heal faster, quicker, better,” Sharma explained. “We don’t look to replace physicians or clinicians. We’re looking to give them tools to augment diagnostic capabilities.”


READ MORE:
Hayley Wickenheiser receives honorary University of Saskatchewan degree

The traditional remedy for a concussion has been to eliminate physical activity and limit sensory stimuli until the brain is healed. New research suggests some physical activity helps recovery.

Playing a video game with a brain injury may seem counterintuitive given sensitivity to light and screens, but Sharma believes games could retrain and thus restore the concussed brain.

WATCH: Advice to Canada’s flag bearer: Don’t trip





“The hope would be, eventually, we would have a game that, depending on symptoms, patients could play and it would help raise their threshold for what they can do on a computer screen before they have symptoms,” he said. “Slowly and gradually we’d raise that threshold to bring it back to normal.

“You use games that aren’t as intrusive or games where you have different speeds at which things are moving and things are flashing. What you’re doing is you’re really slowly building up their tolerance where all of a sudden computer screens don’t cause a problem because they’ve been using gaming to get better.”


READ MORE:
Canadian women’s hockey star Hayley Wickenheiser announces retirement

In practical terms, instead of sitting in a dark room between physiotherapy and rehabilitation appointments, Wickenheiser believes the ability to augment and chart recovery doing something fun at home could accelerate return to play or work.

“I’ve had teammates who have had to literally go home and sit in the dark. I was through that once myself for a short time,” she said.

“One of the things that happens when you have a head injury, you often don’t know how much better you’re getting and there’s a feeling of hopelessness and fear that comes with that.

“If you’re tracking yourself on a day-to-day basis and seeing improvement or know you’re helping yourself improve, I think it also helps with the recovery because the stress level goes down.”

The 39-year-old from Shaunavon, Sask., retired as Canada’s all-time leading scorer in January.

WATCH: Hayley Wickenheiser hangs up her skates





The women’s team congregated in Calgary this week to start full-time preparation for the upcoming Winter Olympics. Wickenheiser did that five times in her career en route to four gold.


READ MORE:
Female coach in NHL is just a question of timing

“I’ll say it’s definitely a little strange for sure because you’re used to the routine,” she said. “I’m so busy with other stuff right now, I’m filling the gap.”

Wickenheiser will join San Jose Sharks centre Logan Couture and former NHL player Eric Lindros at Western University in London, Ont., on Wednesday to speak at and promote the school’s concussion treatment and awareness program.

She’s fighting the concussion battle on multiple fronts.

“I’m a big believer that academia alone isn’t going to get this done,” she said. “I think we need the private sector.”

“There’s just so much more we can develop and I think we can make people aware of.”


Go to Source

[Top]

Category: Video Games

Wickenheiser backs development of video games to treat concussions

Posted on August 17, 2017  in Video Games

Hayley Wickenheiser’s reasons for helping develop video game technology to treat concussions are close to her heart.

The four-time Olympic gold medallist in women’s hockey remembers the dizziness and nausea she felt after taking a hit in a Swedish men’s pro league in 2008.

Wickenheiser also witnessed the deterioration of friend and former NHL player Steve Montador, who was diagnosed after his death in 2015 with chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

CTE is a degenerative brain condition that doctors believe is caused by concussions.

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Hayley Wickenheiser’s reasons for helping develop video game technology to treat concussions are close to her heart.

The four-time Olympic gold medallist in women’s hockey remembers the dizziness and nausea she felt after taking a hit in a Swedish men’s pro league in 2008.


Canada's Hayley Wickenheiser receives her silver medal after losing 1-0 to Team USA in the gold medal game at the women's world hockey championships, Monday, April 4, 2016 in Kamloops, B.C. Wickenheiser's reasons for helping develop video game technology to treat concussions are close to her heart.The four-time Olympic gold medallist in women's hockey remembers the dizziness and nausea she felt after taking a hit in a Swedish men's pro league in 2008. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Canada’s Hayley Wickenheiser receives her silver medal after losing 1-0 to Team USA in the gold medal game at the women’s world hockey championships, Monday, April 4, 2016 in Kamloops, B.C. Wickenheiser’s reasons for helping develop video game technology to treat concussions are close to her heart.The four-time Olympic gold medallist in women’s hockey remembers the dizziness and nausea she felt after taking a hit in a Swedish men’s pro league in 2008. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Wickenheiser also witnessed the deterioration of friend and former NHL player Steve Montador, who was diagnosed after his death in 2015 with chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

CTE is a degenerative brain condition that doctors believe is caused by concussions.

Wickenheiser co-chairs the advisory board of Highmark Interactive, a Toronto digital therapeutics company developing video games to diagnose and treat concussion and brain injuries.

She’s joined on the board by former New Jersey Devils captain Bryce Salvador, snowboarder Mark McMorris and Pittsburgh Penguins director of sport science Andy O’Brien.

“Everyone involved with this project had a bit of a connection to head trauma in some way shape or form,” Wickenheiser said in an interview. “Losing Steve Montador who was one of my best friends to . . . he obviously had CTE which we found out after he passed away. Watching him degrade as a person over the years, I think looking back after he passed away, I felt ‘Is there something I can do to honour Steve that will be to continue down this road and help other people?'”

Highmark is 12 to 18 months away from going to market with the games, according to founder Dr. Sanjeev Sharma.

“Our fundamental thesis is between neuroplasticity, where the brain does heal itself, and the proper utilization of gaming and the stimulus that gaming provides the brain, we believe we can build a game that will eventually enable the concussed individual to heal faster, quicker, better,” Sharma explained. “We don’t look to replace physicians or clinicians. We’re looking to give them tools to augment diagnostic capabilities.”

The traditional remedy for a concussion has been to eliminate physical activity and limit sensory stimuli until the brain is healed. New research suggests some physical activity helps recovery.

Playing a video game with a brain injury may seem counterintuitive given sensitivity to light and screens, but Sharma believes games could retrain and thus restore the concussed brain.

“The hope would be, eventually, we would have a game that, depending on symptoms, patients could play and it would help raise their threshold for what they can do on a computer screen before they have symptoms,” he said. “Slowly and gradually we’d raise that threshold to bring it back to normal.

“You use games that aren’t as intrusive or games where you have different speeds at which things are moving and things are flashing. What you’re doing is you’re really slowly building up their tolerance where all of a sudden computer screens don’t cause a problem because they’ve been using gaming to get better.”

In practical terms, instead of sitting in a dark room between physiotherapy and rehabilitation appointments, Wickenheiser believes the ability to augment and chart recovery doing something fun at home could accelerate return to play or work.

“I’ve had teammates who have had to literally go home and sit in the dark. I was through that once myself for a short time,” she said. “One of the things that happens when you have a head injury, you often don’t know how much better you’re getting and there’s a feeling of hopelessness and fear that comes with that.

“If you’re tracking yourself on a day-to-day basis and seeing improvement or know you’re helping yourself improve, I think it also helps with the recovery because the stress level goes down.”

The 39-year-old from Shaunavon, Sask., retired as Canada’s all-time leading scorer in January.

The women’s team congregated in Calgary this week to start full-time preparation for the upcoming Winter Olympics. Wickenheiser did that five times in her career en route to four gold.

“I’ll say it’s definitely a little strange for sure because you’re used to the routine,” she said. “I’m so busy with other stuff right now, I’m filling the gap.”

Wickenheiser will join San Jose Sharks centre Logan Couture and former NHL player Eric Lindros at Western University in London, Ont., on Wednesday to speak at and promote the school’s concussion treatment and awareness program.

She’s fighting the concussion battle on multiple fronts.

“I’m a big believer that academia alone isn’t going to get this done,” she said. “I think we need the private sector.

“There’s just so much more we can develop and I think we can make people aware of.”

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Category: Video Games

Recent study explains how video games may be damaging the brain

Posted on August 17, 2017  in Video Games

More surprising is the mental decay which could be come from button mashing marathons.

Barrett Davis tries to complete video games as fast as he can.

He’s a competitive speed runner, a software sprinter.

“People aren’t making a ton of money off of it. It’s more about personal pride,” said Davis.

A good one at that, he currently holds the world record for one game and is in second for another.

Davis practices “probably closer to like 20 like 30” to rush through video games as quickly as possible.

One study from McGill University says playing games repetitively could be damaging his brain.

Health experts already know excessive screen time is bad for your eyes and your sleep cycle:

“It messes with attention problems- and a lot of people on electronics for a long time- it doesn’t let their brain shut off properly,” said Autumn, WIlson, Nurse Practitioner.

Most young people already get too much screen time, but the McGill findings are especially concerning for game-a-holics like Davis.

The study claims replaying the games can decay gray matter meaning potential memory problems and higher likelihood of conditions like depression.

Despite the study’s findings, Davis says he doesn’t plan on giving up his quest for quickness.

“It’s just going to be something I can continue to pick up and do for fun,” said Davis. For him, the joy of the joystick outweighs the risk.

It’s important to keep in mind the benefits of gaming in moderation, including hand-eye-coordination.

The McGill study also says playing games in less repetitive ways does not damage the brain in any measurable way.

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Category: Video Games

Video games might be an Olympic branch by 2024

Posted on August 17, 2017  in Video Games

France will conduct negotiations with the representatives of the International Olympics Committee (IOC) and sports competitions on video games’ integration into the Olympic Games, even moving e-games into the medal system.

Paris, one of the member cities for the 2024 Olympic Games, wants to integrate electronic games into the Olympics.

Co-chairman of France Olympic Committee, Tony Estanguet stated that they will negotiate with the representatives of sports competitions and the IOC on integrating video games into the Olympics and awarding them medals.

“We have to deal with this issue as it wouldn’t be true to say that we have nothing to do with video games,” said Estanguet.

Stressing that young people connect closely with e-games, Estanguet added, “The process on the issue will be understood better by bringing the IOC and electronic sports representatives together.”

Electronic sports have previously been integrated into the schedule at the Asia Games. This branch is expected to host medal contests in the 2022 Asia Games. The decision on electronic sports integration to the Olympic Games is up to the IOC.

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Category: Video Games

VIDEO: Red Deer getting ready for Canada Winter Games

Posted on August 16, 2017  in Video Games

The road to the Canada Winter Games in Red Deer is officially underway.

Red Deer will host the 27th edition of the Canada Winter Games in 2019 from Feb. 15 to March 3.

Following the Canada Summer Games wrapping up in Winnipeg on Aug. 13, the Canada Games flag was passed to Red Deer Mayor Tara Veer and the torch was carried out of the stadium by Red Deer’s Reece Lehman.

“Now that the torch has literally and figuratively been passed, our community preparations will elevate over the next 18 months,” Veer said.

Related: Torch, flag passed to Red Deer

Organizers and volunteers will work hard to ensure next year’s event is ready, said 2019 Canada Winter Games chair Lyn Radford.

“While we have a lot of work to do over the next 18 months, the next chapter of Canada Games history begins in Red Deer,” said Radford.

After visiting the Canada Summer Games in Winnipeg, Radford is very excited to have the Winter Games in Red Deer, but before that can happen there are a few more things that need to get done.

Both making and successfully implementing their plans over the next year and a half is key to make the Canada Winter Games run smoothly, Radford said.

“There are a lot of moving pieces … and all those pieces will have to come together here in the near future. We aren’t panicking, but we can definitely feel the clock ticking now,” she said.

Getting the community ready for the event is one of the biggest things on the to-do list, Radford said.

“It’ll be the first Red Deer will be on a national stage for an event this big and that requires individuals and organizations to think about what they can do to showcase the community when people arrive there,” she said.

Most venue agreements, for both sports and athlete accommodation, are nearing completion.

“We’re very excited to bring this event to our community,” she said. “To bring the nation to Red Deer is going to be absolutely phenomenal.”

On Oct. 3, the city will celebrate being 500 days away from the start of the game and a Feb. 15 event will mark being one year away.

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